Garden Alphabet: Azalea

Garden Alphabet: Azalea

I hadn’t experienced azalea much until I moved her to California. Then, of course, I inherited a garden full of them. They are reliable, relatively maintenance free perennials that put on a good flower show every year. They also come in a variety of colors, so gardeners have a good choice of how to fit them into their own garden schemes.

Garden Alphabet: Azalea from A Gardener's Notebook

Azalea

“Azaleas (pron.: /əˈzeɪliə/) are flowering shrubs comprising two of the eight subgenera of the genus Rhododendron, Tsutsuji (evergreen) and Pentanthera (deciduous). Azaleas bloom in spring in the Northern hemisphere and in winter in the Southern hemisphere, their flowers often lasting several weeks. Shade tolerant, they prefer living near or under trees.” — Wikipedia.org

More information on Azalea:

 

Previously in Garden Alphabet:

“Azaleas (pron.: /əˈzeɪliə/) are flowering shrubs comprising two of the eight subgenera of the genus Rhododendron, Tsutsuji (evergreen) and Pentanthera (deciduous). Azaleas bloom in spring in the Northern hemisphere and in winter in the Southern hemisphere, their flowers often lasting several weeks. Shade tolerant, they prefer living near or under trees.” – Wikipedia.org

Garden Vocabulary: Palmatum

Garden Vocabulary LogoGarden Vocabulary: Palmatum

Today’s Garden Vocabulary is another garden epithet — a descriptive term — usually Latin — that is used as part of a plants name to describe its most defining characteristic. Palmatum means “shaped like the palm of a hand” 1 and is used quite frequently in plant descriptions. This weeks “Interesting Plant” entry is one example — Acer Palmatum, the Japanese Maple. While some varieties exhibit palmatum more than others, almost all of them show leaves that are vaguely palm shaoed, hence the palmatum adjective.

What can you share about this Garden Vocabulary entry? Help educate us all in the comments!

 

Japanese Maple Leaves
 
 
More information on Palmatum:
From Amazon.com:
 
  
 
Plants and seeds from Amazon.com:
 
 

 

  
Previously on Garden Vocabulary:

This Garden Vocabulary series seeks to introduce and explain to you — and in many cases, myself — words and terms associated with gardening. Please let me know if  there are any terms you would like me to explore. You can leave your ideas in the comments section and we can learn together!

Event: Bonsai Demonstration with Bonsai Master, Frank Goya – February 1, 2014 at 1pm – Pacific Palisades, CA

Frank goya

Bonsai Demonstration with Bonsai Master, Frank Goya

February 1, 2014 at 1 PM.

Los Angeles Public Library, Pacific Palisades Branch

861 Alma Real Drive. Pacific Palisades, CA 90272

 

Frank Goya will give a demonstration of his art at the Pacific Palisades Library. Frank has been a bonsai and saikei artist for over 50 years.

“Saikei” is a creation that consists of bonsai trees, other plants, rocks, and ground cover that form a scene from nature. F

rank is considered to be the Number One practitioner of saikei – as well as one of the top five bonsai masters — in the United States.

He will demonstrate how to make a saikei, starting from scratch, showing all the steps from planting the bonsai trees, to creating mountains and rivers.

When he is finished, this wonderful piece of art will be raffled off.

Saikei6

Interesting Plant: Acer palmatum ‘Sango-kaku’ (Coral Bark Japanese Maple)

Interesting Plant: Acer palmatum ‘Sango-kaku’ (Coral Bark Japanese Maple)

I grew up in Ohio surrounded by maple trees of all sorts, from the large over-arching hard maples on the Main Streets to sugar maples dotted across the farms and in sugar bushes harvested for maple syrup. These maples don’t grow well here in sunny southern California, but I was equally charmed by the Japanese Maples that do grow here. There is so much beauty and variety among the Acer palmatum and something for nearly everyone to enjoy. This Coral Bark Maple is just one example of this wide-ranging species.

From Washington State University

“The Japanese maple cultivar ‘Sango Kaku’, often referred to as Coral bark maple, is generally one of the most prized of all of the upright palmate types for its winter interest. The bark on new twigs turns bright coral red (almost fluorescent) after the leaves fall. In areas west of the Cascade Mountains, this cultivar is one of the most widely grown of all of the upright, green-foliage Japanese maples. In Japan the name ‘Sango Kaku’ refers to “coral-painted”. ”

Traditional Landscape by Sea Girt Landscape Architects & Designers Barlow Flower Farm

Acer palmatum, called Japanese Maple or Smooth Japanese Maple (Japanese: irohamomijiイロハモミジ, or momiji紅葉) is a species of woody plant native to JapanNorth Korea,South KoreaChina, eastern Mongolia, and southeast Russia.[2] Many different cultivars of this maple have been selected and they are grown worldwide for their attractive leaf shapes and colours.

Acer palmatum is a deciduous shrub or small tree reaching heights of 6 to 10 m (20 to 33 ft), rarely 16 metres (52 ft), often growing as an understory plant in shady woodlands. It may have multiple trunks joining close to the ground. In habit, it is often shaped like a hemisphere (especially when younger) or takes on a dome-like form, especially when mature.[3] Theleaves are 4–12 cm long and wide, palmately lobed with five, seven, or nine acutely pointed lobes. The flowers are produced in small cymes, the individual flowers with five red or purple sepals and five whitish petals. The fruit is a pair of winged samaras, each samara 2–3 cm long with a 6–8 mm seed. The seeds of Japanese maple and similar species requirestratification in order to germinate.[3][4]“ – Wikipedia.org 

More information on Stenocarpus sinuatus:

From Amazon.com:
 
 
Plants and seeds from Amazon.com:
 
 

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas

Garden Alphabet: Currant (Ribes)

Garden Alphabet: Currant (Ribes)

During our last trip to Ohio, I was surprised to see so many wild currant bushes in the fence rows, parks and yards. I don’t remember currants from my childhood at all and I am not sure how I missed their existence, as we spent many long days wandering about the wood lots and farms of my small town. I saw many varieties of currents on this trip. This is an orange variety, but I also saw red, purple and almost blue varieties, too.

Garden Alphabet: Currant (Ribes) | A Gardener's Notebook with Douglas E. Welch

Ribes

Ribes /ˈrbz/ is a genus of about 150 species of flowering plants native throughout the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It is usually treated as the only genus in the family Grossulariaceae. Seven subgenera are recognized.

Sometimes Ribes is instead included in the family Saxifragaceae. A few taxonomists place the gooseberry species in a separate genus of Grossularia.

The genus Ribes includes the edible currants (blackcurrantredcurrantwhitecurrant), gooseberry, and several hybrid varieties. It should not be confused with the dried currant used in cakes and puddings, which is a cultivar of small grape (Zante currant). It gives its name to the popular blackcurrant cordial Ribena.

The genus also includes the group of ornamental plants collectively known as the flowering currants, for instance R. sanguineum.

There are restrictions on growing some Ribes species in some U.S. states, as they are a host for White Pine Blister Rust.” – Wikipedia.org

More information on Tomato:
Books:
 
 
Plants and seeds for Amazon.com:

 

Previously in Garden Alphabet:

Garden Decor: Moss Buddha via Tumblr

Moss Buddha

I could imagine this cool, moss -covered Buddha presiding over some quiet corner of my garden. Too dry here for moss, but that doesn’t mean I can’t appreciate both the idea and the photo.

Discovered via Tumblr User SpiritsWildAndFree

 Previously in Garden Decor:

Photo: New onions rising in the garden

Our latest batch of onion sets are rising in the garden!

New onions rising in the garden

New onions rising in the garden

Video: In the garden…short!: January 9, 2014: Onion sets pushing out of the ground

Agn artwork

Our onion sets are pushing out of the ground for the beginning of another growing season..

Agn 20140109 short onions thumb

 

Check out what was happening in the garden a year ago: “Container Garden Update 10

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

 

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music: ‘Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Please Like this video and/or subscribe to my channel on YouTube.

Your likes and subscriptions directly reflect how many other viewers are suggested this video.

 

“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Video: In the garden…January 7, 2014: Pruning the wisteria

Agn artwork

Time to prune the wisteria on the backyard pergola while it is still dormant. It is probably a but late, but better late than never.

Itg 20140107 thumb

 

Check out what was happening in the garden a year ago: “Container Garden Update 10

Check out my collection of gardening essays, “From A Gardener’s Notebook” now available as a Kindle eBook. (You don’t need a Kindle to read it, though. Read it on your PC, Link: http://j.mp/fagnbook

 

Watch all past episodes of “In the garden…” in this YouTube Playlist


Music: ‘Hustle” by Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Please Like this video and/or subscribe to my channel on YouTube.

Your likes and subscriptions directly reflect how many other viewers are suggested this video.

 

“In the garden…” is a series for A Gardener’s Notebook highlighting what is happening in my garden, my friend’s gardens and California gardens throughout the seasons. 

Interesting Plant: Linderniaceae (formerly Torenia) Kuaui Deep Blue

Interesting Plant: Linderniaceae (formerly Torenia) Kuaui Deep Blue

The purplish-blue of these flowers caught my eye as I scrolled through Pinterest the other day. The ability to browse visually through all the pins is one things that makes me like Pinterest so much. It is part social media and part serendipity as you stumble across something you have never heard of before — much like these flowers. This reinforces one of the many reasons I do this Interesting Plant series. I figure that if something strikes my fancy you might find it interest, too.

From Spring HIll Nurseries…

“Torenia is known as the Wishbone Flower because of the connected anthers in the center shaped just like a tiny wishbone. The new Kauai™ Torenias have large, vividly colored flowers on compact plants, and they take heat and humidity in their stride! They like moist, fertile, well drained soil, but will tolerate some lapses in watering. A great way to bring easy-care color to your shady spots!”

Kauai deep blue

Discovered via Pinterest User, Bountiful Plants

Torenia is a genus of plants now classified in the Linderniaceae. Often called Wishbone flowers, some species are grown as gardenplants. Many F1 and F2 Torenia hybrids have been hybridizied in the last 30 years. Colors can range from white with yellow throats to violet, blue, cobalt, lavender and purple.– Wikipedia.org 

More information on Stenocarpus sinuatus:

From Amazon.com:
 
 
Plants and seeds from Amazon.com:
 
 

Previously in the Interesting Plant series: 

Interesting Plant is a series from A Gardener’s Notebook blog and podcast that highlights the most interesting plants I find in my Internet and real-world travels — Douglas