Historical Seed Catalogs: Seeds bulbs plants (1920) by Emma V. White – 46 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: 1916 seed catalog by Mills Seed Company (1916) – 45 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Seeds bulbs plants (1920) by Emma V. White - 46 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: Seeds bulbs plants (1920) by Emma V. White - 46 in a series

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To Our Friends:

Spring time will soon be upon us; so this, our 24th Annual Catalog, comes as a greeting to. many old friends — and a word of friendly suggestion to new ones — lovers, all, of the beautiful diversion and practical pleasure — the Flower Garden and its more prosaic partner, the Home Vegetable plot.

As you will note, since our previous Catalog was issued, we have incorpor- ated our business, insuring a little more method and system, and giving oppor- tunity for younger hands and heads to help us serve our friends better than ever.

The spirit and plan remains the same — based as it is upon a love of flowers and the joy of working in the fresh, cool soil of the well kept garden.

Our old patrons will also note that in this issue we have specialized upon certain flower varieties, which we feel can be appreciated fully only in your own gardens the coming season.

But we feel that we should also do a little more to encourage the Kitchen Garden; fresh vegetables for your table mean practical economy and a double pleasure to the amateur gardener. As says the Garden Page of the New York Sun: “With the price of food constantly soaring, there never was a greater need of home gardens than now — higher rather than lower prices confront us.”

Plan to have a garden — vegetable as well as flowers — both will give you joy; and the work in the garden is better than medicine.

Yours truly,

EMMA V. WHITE CO.

 


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Dazzling Dahlias – 13 in a series – Dahlia in the Dust via Sofia Weström on WTSocial

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Dazzling Dahlias - 13 in a series - Dahlia in the Dust via Sofia Weström on WTSocial

An amazing photo of this dahlia. Typically I don’t like flash photos, but this one seems to make the flower shimmer and shine. 

See Dahlia in the Dust on WT.Social


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An interesting link found among my daily reading

From Gardening Don’ts (1913) by M.C. 05

From Gardening Don'ts (1913) by M.C. 05

DON’T forget that in the
world of flowers, the
un-rehearsed effect is often the
most attractive, and the un-
invited guest sometimes as
welcome as her more formal
sisters.

From Gardening Don'ts by M.C. 01

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Historical Garden Books – 57 in a series – The Garden magazine, April 1920

Historical Garden Books – 57 in a series – The Garden magazine, April 1920

Historical Garden Books - 57 in a series - The Garden magazine, April 1920Historical Garden Books - 57 in a series - The Garden magazine, April 1920

Historical Garden Books - 57 in a series - The Garden magazine, April 1920Historical Garden Books - 57 in a series - The Garden magazine, April 1920

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Table of Contents

COVER DESIGN: THE EASTER LILY – Herbert Brown

WELCOME IS SUCH SHADE AS THIS AND SUCH A
VISTA AFTER THE GLARE OK FULL SUN ON A
HOT DAY ! —– 89

Photograph by John W. Gillies
A LIVING PILLAR OF FIRE, WITHOUT EXCEPTION

THE FINEST ROSE OF ITS TYPE IN THE

WORLD— THE CLIMBING ROSE EXCELSA – – 90

Photograph by The J. Horace McFarland Co.
HERE WHERE THE ASCENT IS LOST IN GLOOM OF

OVERTOPPING PINES BROODS THE STILL

MYSTERY OF A TEMPLE PATH – 91

Photograph by Mattie E. Hewitt

PLANT BRIEFS – – – 92

ROSES REMADE FOR AMERICA – J. Horace McFarland 93

Photographs by The J. Horace McFarland Co., Ernest

Crandall, and others

YOUR PRIVET HEDGE Charles Clark 99

FLIGHTS AND FRIVOLS OF THE APHIDS

Edith M. Patch 100

Photographs by the author
GROWING LIMAS THAT ARE FIT FOR LUCULLUS

Adolph Kruhm 102

Photographs by the author
THE BEST CULTURE FOR LIMAS – Archibald Rutledge 103
INTELLIGENT USE OF FERTILIZERS —— 104

A NEW DISCOVERY FOR THE LILY LOVER – – – – 105

Photographs by E. A. White
LILIES MADE TO ORDER – – Howard Ellsworth Gilhey 107

Photograph by Arthur G. Eldredge and others
WHY THE HOUSEKEEPER GARDENS

Sarah M. McCollom 109

Photographs supplied by the author
A LANDSCAPE PLAN FOR A COMPLETE PLACE

J. M. Rost 1 1 1
SELECTIONS FROM THE NOVELTY OFFERINGS 6″F

THE SEASON – – – – – – 112

A LATTICE GARDEN SHELTER SEEN IN FRANCE

E. C. Stiles 1 1 4
THE ROMANCE OF OUR TREES— VII. THE BEECHES

Ernest H. Wilson 1 1 5

Photographs by Charles Sanwald and others
ROSES THAT CLIMB ARE ADAPTABLE Sherman Duffy 120

Photograph by the author
ROSES IN THE TEMPERAMENTAL ZONES C. L. Meller 121

Photograph by the author
VIEWS IN THE GARDEN OF WELD – – 122

Photographs by Mattie E. Hewitt and Mary H. Northend
TENDER ANNUALS FROM SEED – – – N. R. Allen 124

AMONG OUR GARDEN NEIGHBORS – 125

THE OPEN COLUMN —— – 126

THE MONTH’S REMINDER 128

BLACKBERRIES FOR WHERE YOU LIVE E . 1 . F arringion 130
THE LURE OF THE SEEDLINGS ——– 134

NEW GLADIOLUS REGISTERED – 134

THREE WAYS TO GET RID OF DANDELIONS – – – 136
HOW TO MAKE A “CROSS” – – – – – H. E. Cilkey 138
WHEN MULTIPLICATION IS NOT VEXATION

Sherman R. Duffy 140
THE AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY – – – E. A. While 142
TRAINED INSPECTORS NEEDED

Massachusetts Horticultural Society 144

MARKING DRILLS C. E. Curtis 146

PATRIOTIC COLOR NOTES – – – Mrs. R. W. Walters 146
HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL —– Kate B. Burton 148
CREOSOTE LENGTHENS LIFE OF FENCE POSTS – – 148

SALVAGE FROM WEEDS – – – – 150

A HANDY ROSE GROWERS’ MANUAL —— 152

WHAT IS A GROUND COVER? – Stephen F. Hamblin 152
HOW TO TREAT LETTUCE PLANTS

Emily Halson Rowland 152

Leonard Barron, Editor



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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 12 in a series – Yellow Hedgehog Echinopsis Flower

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 12 in a series – Yellow Hedgehog Echinopsis Flower

Yellow Hedgehog Echinopsis flower

Yellow Hedgehog Echinopsis flower
Probably this cultivar, Echinopsis cv. Yellow California:

Great time to visit the Cactus garden. Lots in bloom now, lots of buds for more soon!

Via Peter D. Tillman on Flickr

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Dazzling Dahlias – 12 in a series – Dahlia ‘Fur Elise’ via Longwood Gardens

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Dazzling Dahlias - 12 in a series - Dahlia 'Fur Elise'

The flowers of dahlia Fur Elise fit this color profile and have all the tropical warmth of a perfectly ripe mango. They are a classic, decorative dahlia shape and measure 3 to 4″ across — the ideal size for mixed arrangements. Combined with burgundy and purple it’s a definite wow.

 


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An interesting link found among my daily reading

Historical Seed Catalogs: 1916 seed catalog by Mills Seed Company (1916) – 45 in a series

Historical Seed Catalogs: 1916 seed catalog by Mills Seed Company (1916) – 45 in a series

Download in Text, PDF, Single Page JPG, TORRENT from Archive.org

OUR GREETING- TO YOU THIS SEASON OF 1916 brings within your reach the largest and finest assortment that we have ever offered in things that grow for people’s nse. Whether grains, vegetables or small fruits, or whether it be the decorative and artistic, such as lawn grass, flowering shrubs, plants or vines, both for growing’ outside in the sunshine and rain, or for grow- ing inside to impart an air of warmth and cheer during the winter months while the rest of nature is asleep, we are prepared to furnish at reasonable prices and no house can give better service than we are prepared to give.

TO SHOW YOU THE FROFIT FROM A “MILLS” GARDEN, we are permitted to quote the following unsolicited letter from a customer:

Mills Seed Co., Washington, Iowa.

Gentlemen: I have used your seeds for four years

and have had the greatest success. Last year I raised
a large garden for my own use and also sold over $100.00
worth. I recommend “Mills” seeds to any one wanting
good fertile seeds. Yours truly,

MRS. WILLIAM KELLOGG, Brayton, S. Dak.


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From Gardening Don’ts (1913) by M.C. 04

DON’T, when invited to inspect a friend’s horticultural efforts, enlarge the whole time on the beauties of someone else’s garden that they have never seen.

From Gardening Don'ts by M.C. 01

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Historical Garden Books – 56 in a series – The rescue of an old place (c.1892) by Mary Caroline (Pike) Robbins

Historical Garden Books – 56 in a series – The rescue of an old place (c.1892) by Mary Caroline (Pike) Robbins

Historical Garden Books - 56 in a series - The rescue of an old place (c.1892) by Mary Caroline (Pike) RobbinsHistorical Garden Books - 56 in a series - The rescue of an old place (c.1892) by Mary Caroline (Pike) Robbins

Historical Garden Books - 56 in a series - The rescue of an old place (c.1892) by Mary Caroline (Pike) RobbinsHistorical Garden Books - 56 in a series - The rescue of an old place (c.1892) by Mary Caroline (Pike) Robbins

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IN the very heart of old New England towns there may often be seen some dilapidated house falling into ruins, surrounded by half-dead fruit-trees and straggling shrubs, while an adjacent garden, once productive and blooming, runs to waste beside it. Its gates are off the hinges, the fences falling to pieces, the hedges untrimmed, the flower-beds smothered in weeds; coarse burdocks and rampant wild vines encumber the ground and run over into the highway, the trim paths have disappeared, the out-houses are toppling over : forlornness and abandonment speak in every line of the decaying house, the former gentility of which renders its decline still more melancholy.



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Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 11 in a series – Opuntia Transplant In My Garden

Prickly-Pear Cactus (Opuntia)

Captivating Cactus and Striking Succulents: 11 in a series - Opuntia Transplant In My Garden

A couple of years ago I was able to take several paddles from a neighbor’s prickly Pear cactus. All five of these petals have grown into healthy, new, large plants.

Now I am taking the time to transplant them into the garden from the pots where they had been growing. Two of them are in including this one with three yet to go. in this bed, I moved out three roses that were suffering from the increased shade of the mature trees and move them to the front garden.

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